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I would like to know if you will stock this record

I would like to know if you stock this record

I think the first one sounds better because the record I am talking too is not out yet but I also know the rule of "no will" with when or if

  • 1. Have you got this record/CD? or 2. Do you have [title of song/album] by....? – Mari-Lou A Feb 23 at 11:45
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Your two sentences mean different things.

The first is asking a business whether it is willing to stock the record. This is a question that might well be posed by a sales person.

It's like asking someone: I would like to know if/whether you will help us. That's to say, whether you are prepared to help us.

The second is asking whether it does stock the record.

The enterprise might well reply saying either that it does not, that it does (and there are some in stock) or that it does (but they are out of stock).

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  • It's also worth mentioning that I also know the rule of "no will" with when or if is not related to his type of sentence because the main clause "I would like to know" is not a consequence of the if clause. – Anatolii Feb 23 at 11:44
  • True: Alternatively, you could use are you going to stock or might you stock. They all suit the purpose. – Ronald Sole Feb 23 at 13:32

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