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I have recently heard a native English speaker use the present perfect before the word until. For example:

What the guy does with his body is something out of this world. I have never seen anything like that. Until a few days later when I saw a guy who did somothing even more impressive.

Isn't it ungrammatical. Would it be more natural to use the past perfect there? For example:

What the guy does with his body is something out of this world. I had never seen anything like that. Until a few days later when I saw a guy who did somothing even more impressive.

If it is not more natural to use the present perfect, then could you explain why?

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You are mixing up logic and language.

I have never seen anything like that

is perfectly grammatical although, in context, it does not make strict logical sense because X is self-evidently like X. Obviously, however, what was meant was

I have never seen anything else like that,

which is both strictly logical and grammatical.

An alternative is

I had never seen anything like that before, nor have I seen anything like it since.

The point is that people say things that would never pass muster in a class on symbolic logic. That does not make them ungrammatical. Moreover, many times those illogical things are not interpreted in an illogical way because people interpret them under the assumption that utterances are not always expressed precisely but are intended as sane.

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  • I am sorry, but is my second sentence with the past perfect as natural as the first one. Do they mean the same? – Dmytro O'Hope Feb 27 '20 at 20:17
  • Are we talking about writing or casual speech? Sentences in casual speech are frequently inconsistent. Clearly no one would write "I have never seen anything like it until yesterday." But people say things like "I have never seen anything like it. Well that is, up until yesterday, when ..." Casual sppech abounding in inconsistencies, digressions, qualifications, and corrections is natural. On the other hand, the more logical "I had never seen anything like it until yesterday" would be natural, indeed typical, in even informal writing. Your OP implied distinct spoken sentences. – Jeff Morrow Feb 27 '20 at 21:43

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