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Is it correct to write -

According to the conditions of my scholarship, after finishing my degree, the University will employ me.

The university doesn't finish the degree. So if I write 'after finishing my degree, the University will employ me', doesn't it misplace the modifier?

  • @WeatherVane But the university does not finish the degree. So if i write 'after finishing my degree, the university will employ me', doesn't it misplace the modifier? – Russell Zaman Mar 2 at 14:25
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    The phrase "after finishing my degree" cannot apply to the university, because it is my degree. – Weather Vane Mar 2 at 14:27
  • The question has changed, so I deleted my comment. – Weather Vane Mar 2 at 14:34
  • @WeatherVane Sorry, new to this platform. Still learning. Should have created a new question instead of editing it and changing the question. – Russell Zaman Mar 2 at 14:39
  • Welcome - please ask one question at a time! – Weather Vane Mar 2 at 14:43
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doesn't it misplace the modifier?

Yes, this looks like a dangling modifier. The reader can probably still understand what was intended since there's only one reasonable interpretation. Also, in speech rather than writing, the rules are more lax.

A better phrasing:

According to the conditions of my scholarship, after I finish my degree, the University will employ me.

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  • Alternately, one could also say "According to the conditions of my scholarship, after finishing my degree, I will be employed by the University." – Foogod Mar 31 at 18:47
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According to the conditions of my scholarship, the University will employ me after I finish my degree.

is really the simplest solution here. Why have so many moving parts when they are not necessary??

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