1

Consider these 2 sentences

Alice's cooking is so bad that her dog doesn't want to eat it.

Alice's cooking is so bad that even her dog doesn't want to eat it.

The latter sounds more idiomatic and natural, right?

It seems that using even sounds more idiomatic and natural in lots of situations, is it true?

2

The sense of the sense of the sense of the

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2

even is not idiomatic. It adds a new information.

Without even, we only know that her dog doesn't want to eat her cooking. We have no information if she has tried to offer her cooking to other animals or persons.

With even, we know/assume that there have been several/many attempts to offer her cooking but nobody wanted to eat it. Each offeree was picky to some (different) extent. But no-one wanted to eat it. Neither the least picky one (her dog).

This would be a neutral understandig of facts in the second sentence. But the second sentence can also be used as an offense. In truth, there have been no attempts to offer her cooking to anyone (besides the speaker perhaps). Nevertheless, the speaker wants to present her cooking as unfavourably as possible and pretends/implies that such attempts have taken place with the result that no-one accepted her cooking. Neither her dog.

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