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In my other post ("that" vs. "if" in the context of indirect question) I said

Actually I am not sure if I dealt with that problem in the right way.

where I put an extra "in".

Another expression is without the extra "in", and seems more common.

Actually I am not sure if I dealt with that problem the right way.

The question is whether both are idiomatic. Any ideas?


The following part should be treated as archived, corresponding the existing discussion.

In my other post I said

I am not sure if I did it in the right way.

where I put an extra "in".

I found lots of people also use the expression.

Another expression is without the extra "in", and seems more common.

I am not sure if I did it the right way.

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Your question is quite the stylistic one.

Indeed, the usage of 'in' may be considered as weird (link). The thing is, 'do in' means 'do in a certain location.' Hence, I have a question: what do you mean when say 'do in a/the right way'? No doubt, you will be understood...but it is not preferred (my personal experience says so, but you can resist if you wish).

On the other hand,I am not sure if I did it the right way implies how you acted. You did it (how?) the right way. And, yes, it is idiomatic, plus lexically and grammatically correct. As proof, Forbes actively uses it.

EDIT: Despite a verb you use (do, deal, etc.) the situation is equivalent: deal the problem (how?) the right way (explanation above), and it is an idiomatic expression (example of usage).

Again, if taken under scrutiny, the preposition "in" is misused.

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  • Thanks for you answer. I guess my bad example mislead you. I've updated my question just now, would you please take a loot at that?
    – WXJ96163
    Mar 12, 2020 at 9:21

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