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I have these words.

You look different. (Had/you/your/dyed/hair/have)?

I need to form the words with have something done.

Would it be like this? Have you had your hair dyed? Or should it be rather You have had your hair dyed?

Same thing with this one

This is a great photo. (can/copy/have/made/we/a)?

Would it be like this?

Can we have a copy made?

or rather:

We can have a copy made?

2 Answers 2

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You look different. Have you had your hair styled differently?

Yes, I have had my hair styled differently.

Remember that question marks do not exist in speech. Interrogatives are marked in both speech and writing by inversion of indicative word order.

This use of "have" is admittedly a bit odd, but essentially regular.

I shall/will have X do Y

expresses my commitment or intention to do in the future what is necessary to cause X to do Y in the future, but

I have had X do Y

expresses that I have already done what was necessary to cause X to do Y. Notice the past aspect of the present tense.

These forms are made interrogative in the standard ways

You have had X do Y

becomes an interrogative by

Have you had X do Y

or

Did you have X do Y

This use of "have" can be made passive as follows

I have had Y done

or

I have had Y done by X.

And these passives can be made interrogative passives as

Have you had Y done

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  • Are these answers right then? Even though they are a bit odd
    – scarce
    Mar 14, 2020 at 18:44
  • You have given multiple examples. "We can have a a copy made?" is wrong if it is intended as a question. As I said in my answer, question marks do not exist in spoken English and thus are not part of English grammar strictly defined. Mar 14, 2020 at 18:55
  • And the first example with the dyed hair?
    – scarce
    Mar 15, 2020 at 16:44
  • Have you had your hair dyed is the interrogative form Mar 15, 2020 at 16:53
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The answer to this is actually pretty straightforward:

Whenever any form of "be", "have", or "can" is used as a "helper" to construct a different tense for another verb (past, future, etc), then when forming a question, you always move that part in front of the subject:

He is riding a bike. --> Is he riding a bike?
He will ride a bike. --> Will he ride a bike?
He has ridden a bike. --> Has he ridden a bike?
He can ride a bike. --> Can he ride a bike?
He could ride a bike. --> Could he ride a bike?

So in your examples, the following are the correct answers:

You have had your hair dyed. --> Have you had your hair dyed?
We can have a copy made. --> Can we have a copy made?

This only applies when "have" is used as a helper to change the form of another verb, though. If "to have" is used as the verb by itself, it behaves like most other verbs:

You ride a bike. --> Do you ride a bike?
You have an apple. --> Do you have an apple?

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