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I'm confused about the sentence below, is it correct? Please help me clear the confusion. I don't understand the meaning of Invoke; is it synonymous with have?

I invoke the right of parley = I have the right of parley.

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What you have written on the left side of your '=' is correct as to the meaning of invoke. That would imply a claim that what is on the right side of the '=' is true.

Macmillan Dictionary: invoke

These definitions from Macmillan dictionary are apt:
1: to use a law or rule in order to achieve something
1a: to mention a law, principle, or idea in order to support an argument or to explain an action.

The dictionary reference also has example sentences.

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Let's look at the definition of the word, "invoke":

to use a law in order to achieve something, or to mention something in order to explain something or to support your opinion or action. (Cambridge)

Police can invoke the law to regulate access to these places.

another definition: If you invoke a law, you state that you are taking a particular action because that law allows or tells you to. (collins dictionary)

so invoke can be used when someone uses, applies or implements a law. also it can be used to explain the fact that someone has the right to take an action because the law allows them to or tells them to.

So have the right to do something and invoke the right to do something can be synonymous in a sense.

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No, they're not the same. You could have the right to parley but not invoke it. Imagine for example the famous "you have the right to remain silent". The person being arrested has the right not to talk, but they might talk anyway. If they do not talk, they are invoking their right to remain silent.

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No, to invoke something is to make use of it. It's a lot more effective to invoke a right if you do in fact have that right, but one can invoke a right one doesn't have, or have a right that one does not invoke.

It's sort of like "I own an apple" versus "I eat an apple". If you're eating an apple, it's beset that you own it, but you can eat an apple you don't own, and you can own an apple you don't eat. They're not synonymous.

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