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There is the following sentence (source):

The rate banks borrow from the Federal Reserve at is called the federal funds rate.

I have never seen before such position of "at" preposition in a sentence. Could I say instead:

The rate at which banks borrow from the Federal Reserve is called the federal funds rate.

Will it be right? Could I also say:

The rate at which the Federal Reserve lends to the banks is called the federal funds rate.
  • Would you mind link the original source your quotation comes from? That would give the community a bigger context. – WXJ96163 Mar 15 at 10:49
  • Of course, I have added it – Ruslan Mar 15 at 11:07
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Reading the citation shows an initial use of "at which" at the beginning of the paragraph and successive use drops "which" as understood, leaving the preposition to stand alone. This does make the readability awkward.

Your suggestion of adding "at which" would be a good revision. However, including the stand-alone preposition "at" in these two sentences is unnecessary since the "rate...is called...." in both instances.

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