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what is the meaning of " had she been so inclined" in this context?

In these letters Kane continually reproaches Margaret with living in deceit and hypocrisy. We have very few of her letters, so that we do not know how far she defended herself. The compiler of the book, though a non- Spiritualist, says: "Poor girl, with her simplicity, ingenuousness and timidity, she could not, had she been so inclined, have practised the slightest deception with any chance of success." This testimony is valuable, as the writer was clearly intimately acquainted with everyone concerned. Kane himself, writing to the younger sister Kate, says: "Take my advice and never talk of the spirits either to friends or strangers. You know that with all my intimacy with Maggie after a whole month's trial I could make nothing of them. Therefore they are a great mystery."

from http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks03/0301051h.html

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The phrase "had she been so inclined" means "[even] if she had wanted to".

The claim is made that the girl was so simple and timid that she could not have succeeded at deceiving even if she had wanted to.

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