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To say that I don't have something and something else, should I say: "I don't have a white shirt AND black trousers."or "I don't have a white shirt OR black trousers."

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  • And means you have both shirt and trousers. Or means you have only one of them.
    – Void
    Mar 25, 2020 at 17:05
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    @DecapitatedSoul That isn't what the OP is asking! They do not have either garment, so it should be "I don't have a white shirt OR black trousers". Mar 26, 2020 at 10:04

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You can use either, but they mean slightly different things:

With a negative clause, "and" means you are applying the negative to both things together as a single unit, while "or" means you're talking about each thing individually and applying the negative to each one. So:

I don't have a white shirt and black trousers.

This means that you don't have the combination of a white shirt and black trousers. You might have just a white shirt, or just black trousers, but not both (or you might have neither).

I don't have a white shirt or black trousers.

This is the same as saying "I don't have a white shirt. I don't have black trousers." It means that you don't have a white shirt (at all), and you also don't have black trousers (at all). So what this really means is you have neither.

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