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What is the meaning of "get warmer and weaker" in the following sentences,

William Shafner, MD, medical director of the National Infectious Diseases Foundation, said in an interview with Fox News: “You must also be aware of the possibility that Corona 19 will remain a flu-like infection.” It is early. ”

“Assuming that Corona 19 is a respiratory virus and reacts like other respiratory viruses like the flu, we can expect the weather to get warmer and weaker,” he said. It may be. ”

(Source: Corona19, will it remain infectious forever? -Comedy.com )

Does "we can expect the weather to get warmer and weaker" mean "We can expect the wether to get warmer and we can expect the Corona 19 to get weaker"? or does "we can expect the weather to get warmer and weaker" mean "We can expect the weather to get warmer and we can expect the weather to get weaker" ?

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    This sentence is confusing. I think he meant, "We can expect the weather to get warmer and the virus to get weaker." Often when people are being interviewed on the news, they misspeak due to nervousness. – SarahT Apr 7 at 2:19
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The sentence as worded does not make sense. The literal reading is that we expect the weather to get warmer and we expect the weather to get weaker. Of course it makes perfect sense to say that as spring comes the weather will get warmer. But what does it mean to say that the weather will get weaker?

When you read a sentence like this that doesn't appear to make sense ... Well, if the general meaning of what he is trying to say is clear, I usually just ignore the curious statement.

Sometimes the person is using a word with a definition that you are not familiar with. This seems uncommon in this case, but who knows?, maybe doctors talk about "weaker weather" meaning "weather that makes viruses weaker" or something like that. I doubt it, I'm not familiar with any such usage of the word, but it's possible. I've certainly run into other cases where I was confused by a word that looked familiar but that the definition I knew didn't apply in this context.

But in this case, I think the more likely possibility is that the good doctor stumbled over his words, or as someone else is quoting him, maybe he was misquoted. Perhaps Dr Shafner meant to say -- or really said and was misquoted -- "warmer or wetter", or "warmer and ..." something else that makes sense for weather. Or maybe, as @SarahT suggests in her comment, he meant to say "weather gets warmer and the virus get weaker".

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