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1?) Scheduled session of learning of english. 2?) Scheduled session of learning english. I guess I understand that in sentences there would be "learning english", because there would be subjects, but what about different from sentences constructions with subjectless action concepts, concepts names or terms, and planned sessions or actions, suggestions?

Other frameworks realizations without that paraphrasing (that is needed): A) To do list (as list with points or array elements of actions for doing): 1) english learning; B) What I found in a book in it's table of contents: "Choosing Levels of English" (it seems strange without "of" after the gerund) C) I'm gonna do english learning now!; D) Get english learning with fun!

I just have not seen anything about usage of such constructions with gerunds and "of" preposition and related to gerunds concepts, and with either options of paraphrasing I feel uncertainty and strangeness in rightness of grammar

Simplification: I'm asking what option of paraphrasing that and generally all similar gerund constructions (not in talking, but as scheduled note or concept or scientific term) would be correct, with one "of" preposition (like "learning of english") or without (like just "learning english"). I could not find anything about it and I always feel wrongness with either option

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Generally, here, we'd say: English language learning.

AND Learning English, as a subject: Learning English is fun. Title: Learning English

We don't say: learning of English because if you have something like: "The learning of English is time consuming.", it would generally be expressed as: "Learning English is time consuming."

The of thing just does not come into play here.

Scheduled sessions of English language learning [of is needed] Scheduled English language learning sessions [adjectivizing the term]

Other examples:

"Choosing Levels of English" is not odd. It refers to the activity of making a choice.

"Making Cakes On Your Stovetop"

"Playing Tennis on Grass"

Those are all activities and the verbs can take a direct object. Choose takes a direct object.

Now, if you take the Shakespeare play: The Taming of the Shrew, the of does come into play. He could have named it: Shrew Taming or Taming a Shrew but as a theatrical title it would not have much impact.

The Taming of the Shrew is very formal and a title.

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  • Hi, @Lambie. Does that mean that all of them, except sentences with outside of that construct subjects or term adjectivizing constructs (like We are learning english), could have both options of using "of" preposition? Like title or concept label or term "adjectivizing the term" and "adjectivizing of the term", and they would have the same meaning, with the latter being just more formal. I thought about this because you also used terms "generally" and similar concept several times, and that activity of making a choice reason is also applicable to "choosing of levels of english" – Sage123 Apr 10 at 23:02
  • @Sage123 "We are learning English" is a progressive tense. Another thing. There is no reason to say: adjectivizing OF the term in normal circumstances. Any verb that can take a direct object does not need "of". Criminalization OF petty offenses is a problem. VERSUS Criminalizing petty offenses is a problem. – Lambie Apr 11 at 0:10

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