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This reminds me of the discussion that

1.I had with Jone (people)

2.at his home (place)

3.in 2018 (time)

4.about the impacts of climate change on the poor (topic)

5.(the discussion) has profound impacts on me (significance)

If keep all the information in the relative clause, can the sentence still sound naturally?

If really should move some pieces of information to the main clause, what should it/them be?

2

With this sentence you could write it as:

I had a discussion with Jone at his home back in 2018, about the impacts of climate change on the poor, which had a profound impact on me.

The main part would be what you did and what it caused, the rest would be the relative side info.

The information that goes in the relative clause. You can try removing different parts of a sentence to see if you can still get the main point you want across.

What is the focus? Who you talked with, what it was about, what it meant? Depending on that, the sentence could be either:

I had a discussion about the effect of climate change on the poor that had a profound impact on me.

or

I had a discussion with my friend Jone about climate change that had a profound impact on me.

The rest goes in the relative clause which can be removed entirely if it's not important to you.

3

You could put it this way:
"This reminds me of a discussion I had with Jones at his home in 2018 about the effects of climate change on the poor that had a profound impact on me."

The main clause is just "this reminds me of a discussion". There are several modifiers attached to "discussion" that are relative clauses or reduced clauses : "that I had with Jones", "that was about the effects of climate change...", "that had a profound impact...".

I think the whole would be clearer as two or three sentences, for example:
"This reminds me of a discussion I had with Jones at his home in 2018. It was about the effects of climate change on the poor. The discussion had a profound impact on me.

A style note: the word "impact" is a good variant on "effect[s]", but it's better not to use it twice in the same sentence or paragraph.

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