1

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/russian-pullback-caused-by-conscription-problems-2014-5

Felgenhauer notes that it would be possible to keep conscripts for only a few months longer than their contracts called for — but that would run the risk of a drastic slip in morale as soldiers overstayed their expected conscription period.

Meanwhile, the arriving batch of Russian conscripts will have had limited training, reducing their battle effectiveness.

The incoming round of conscripts will serve within Russian airborne units, marines, and army brigades.

I don't understand why it should be will have had instead of simple will have. Could you please explain this grammar point to me?

4

The form will have had is the future perfect, which allows you to describe an event that will be complete at some time in the future. This distinct from will have, which is the simple future and describes an event that will occur in the future.

  1. The arriving batch of Russian conscripts will have had limited training.
    The arriving conscripts will have already completed training, which was limited.
  2. The arriving batch of Russian conscripts will have limited training.
    The arriving conscripts will either:
    • have already completed training, which was limited, or;
    • be given training, which will be limited.

The context definitely requires that the first meaning, not the second, be conveyed.

  • @EsotericScreenName Whoops, realised my glosses weren't entirely clear. But I was demonstrating the difference between the two, rather than providing both as possibilities. – jimsug May 29 '14 at 6:25
  • No worries, I realized I didn't read your post as carefully as I should have to begin with. Sorry about that. – Esoteric Screen Name May 29 '14 at 6:26

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