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"Coronavirus isn't the name of any one kind of virus but rather Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that infect both mammals and birds."

Is this sentence grammatically correct? Other than "But rather" what else can I use to combine those 2 sentences?

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  • It sounds natural to me. You can omit 'but'. Coronavirus isn't the name of any kind of virus, rather coronaviruses are a large family.......
    – Void
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 11:36
  • @DecapitatedSoul what about more omissions: "..., rather a large family of viruses that infect both mammals and birds."
    – Cardinal
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 12:41
  • Thank you so much for your answers!
    – user107785
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 12:52
  • 1
    @Cardinal, I meant in this context. :-)
    – Void
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 13:48
  • 1
    You could put some quote marks around the first word, because you are talking about the word "coronavirus" and not the viruses themselves. You are mentioning the word, not using it.
    – James K
    Commented Apr 12, 2020 at 13:49

1 Answer 1

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'But rather' is used to link a negative statement with a following statement, when the first statement negates something incomplete or untrue - here, the first statement negates 'Coronavirus is the name of any one kind of virus' and the second statement provides a fuller, or truer description of the situation: 'Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that infect both mammals and birds'. You could replace 'but rather', or, as has been commented, 'rather', with 'instead', or with a period and make the second statement a new sentence.

not ... but rather ...

used to say that one thing is not true but a different thing is true

The problem is not their lack of funding, but rather their lack of planning.

Not - but rather (Longman Dictionary)

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