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Few lines from a NO OBJECTION CERTIFICATE are as follows:

This certificate is presented to claim no objection on Mr./ Mrs.___________________, in case, if some other company is hired services for any or specific purpose/s.......

My confusions are:

  1. We normally use objection to something but here we have on.

  2. Using if and in case together.

  3. Meaning of company is hired service. (hire someone / something service)

These instances seems utterly odd to me, please explain these instances.

Thanks in advance.

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    Yes, completely weird and probably written by some minor non-English lawyer with no time to check. I'm not sure that there is a good answer to this.
    – James K
    Apr 12, 2020 at 16:02
  • 2
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about domain-specific usages Apr 12, 2020 at 16:09
  • NOCs are specific to the Indian legal system, I believe. Apr 12, 2020 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

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This certificate is presented to claim no objection on Mr./ Mrs.___________________, in case, if some other company is hired services for any or specific purpose/s.......

To all this certificate is to claim that there is no objection to Mr. or Mrs.___ in the case of, or if some other company becomes a hired service for any group of, or specific purpose or purposes.

In legal documents it is not unusual to have phrases repeated in slightly different forms making the English brittle or hard to understand. In case, if Either would be fine but there might be some odd case to be made that the document was inadequate if it did not include each variation. I agree with the comment that perhaps this was written only to sound legalistic or perhaps by a non-professional. I hope my interpretation will suffice.

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