0
  1. "A woman speaking to the TV channel said that it seems nearly impossible to find a retirement home."

My question is if it is the same as "a woman who is/was speaking to ...."

  1. Same question here: "They only admit patients requiring urgent care" = "They only admit patients that is requiring urgent care." ?
0

In terms of meaning, it is the same. In terms of grammatical construction, it is not the same.

A woman speaking to the TV channel...

The part marked in bold is a participial phrase that acts like a defining adjective on woman.

A woman who was speaking to the TV channel...

This is a relative clause where the relative pronoun who links the relative clause to the noun that it follows (woman).

Some people would describe the participial phrase version as an example of whiz-deletion.

| improve this answer | |
0

[1] A woman [who was speaking to the TV channel] said that it seems nearly impossible to find a retirement home.

[2] A woman [speaking to the TV channel] said that it seems nearly impossible to find a retirement home.

Yes, [2] is an alternant to [1], and they both have similar meanings.

But there is a slight grammatical difference: although the bracketed element in both cases is modifying "woman", in [1] it's a relative clause, while in [2] it's a gerund-participial one.

You will likely encounter the term 'reduced relative clause' (or 'whizz-deletion') used to describe the one in [2], but it's a misnomer, since there is no possibility of the clause containing a relative phrase: we can't say *"a woman who speaking to the TV channels.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.