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"I didn't raise you for 15 years so you could go to war".

I found this frase and it didn't sound idiomatic to me. Is there another way of expressing the same idea in the following sentense?

"I didn't pay your college tuition for four years, so you could drop out now!"

Can I say:

"I didn't pay your college tuition for four years, for you to drop out now!"

Any sugestions?

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    You mean drop out of college? What's your question exactly?
    – user3395
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 18:44
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    Both forms would be more idiomatic if preceded by "just". "just for you to" , "just so you could". Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 0:31

1 Answer 1

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Taking the suggestion from the first comment, to use "drop out", and that of including the word "just", let me suggest these as idiomatic sentences:

"I didn't pay your college tuition for four years just for you to drop out now!"
"I didn't pay for your college for four years just so you could drop out now!"

Those are both idiomatic sentences.

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  • I edited it to "drop out". Thanks a lot!
    – Louisr
    Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 6:06

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