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I've always wondered what is the right use of "the" between nouns. From what I'd learned years ago, you have to use "a" or "the" before each noun. But sometimes it looks too much, and it clutters the text. For example, which one of the following sentences is correct?

I improved the social media presence of the company.

I improved social media presence of the company.

I improved the social media presence of company.

I improved social media presence of company.

In other words, there can be potentially two "the"'s in the sentence, so four different outcomes.

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  • How many the's are too much?
    – Lambie
    Apr 24, 2020 at 18:40

2 Answers 2

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Here are the examples with answers:

  • I improved the social media presence of the company.
    • Correct
  • I improved social media presence of the company.
    • Incorrect
  • I improved the social media presence of company.
    • Incorrect
  • I improved social media presence of company.
    • Incorrect

There's nothing wrong with the correct example - I don't think it's too much 'the' - but if you don't want to use 'the' too often, then you could rewrite this sentence in several ways:

  • I improved the social media presence for the company.
  • I improved social media presence for the company.
    • 'The' is implied
      • This form could be used in any of the examples below, though some might find it to sound a little 'clipped.'
  • I improved the social media presence of my company.
  • I improved the social media presence of my client's company.
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The before a noun shows that what is referred to is already known to the speaker, listener, writer and/or reader. The makes a noun specific.

If your sentence indicates a known social media presence, then you should use the. Furthermore, your sentence -I think- mentions an already known social media presence. The usage is accurate. Your company is already known in the sentence’s scope, so you should use the.

I would say the first sentence in your original question is correct.

“I improved the social media presence of the company.”

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