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Please look at these sentences :

  1. Rahim is being admitted into that coaching center we wanted to.
  2. Rahim is getting admitted into that coaching center we wanted to.

Actually I am confused about the using of present continuous here. I meant that Rahim's admission process is happening in front of me. Some people suggested me not to use continuous form because they said I can only know if he is admitted or not after the process is over. Can I say "Rahim is applying for an admission to that coaching center we wanted to" instead of those sentences? Or what can I say that would sound natural?

If he want to get admitted to that coaching center in future, then can I say these :

  1. Rahim is going to be admitted into that coaching center we wanted to.

  2. Rahim will be admitted into that coaching center we wanted to.

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  • Not your question, but both of these sentences are ungrammatical; the to is unnecessary. Apr 27 '20 at 12:19
  • We wanted to isn't appropriate here; it would have to be something like that coaching center we wanted him to attend. But, yes, if the admission process is happening right now it's fine to say he is being admitted. Apr 27 '20 at 12:46
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First, as noted in a comment, none of this is grammatical. The "to" after "wanted" is simply wrong in these sentences.

Second, even with the "to" removed, the wording is potentially confusing. What is literally being said is that "we" wanted that coaching center. I greatly doubt that what is intended is our physical possession or legal ownership of that center. Instead, what is almost certainly intended is that we wanted Rahim's admission into that specific center. A clearer way to say that is

As we wanted, Rahim is being admitted to that coaching center

Third, the use of the present progressive may be appropriate as may the use of the present perfect or the future. It depends on the situation and intended meaning. We start with the difference in meaning between "admit" and "attend."

He has been admitted to Yale

is approrpriate if the sense to be conveyed is that Yale accepted him as a student in the recent past without reference to whether he has yet started attending or has even started to complete the procedures required by that acceptance.

He will be admitted to Yale

is appropriate if the sense to be conveyed is either that it is certain or almost certain that Yale will give permission for him to attend or that Yale has given permission for him to attend after certain procedures have been completed.

He is being admitted to Yale

is appropriate if the sense to be conveyed is that Yale has given permission for him to attend subject to his doing certain things that are not yet complete.

The point here is that tenses may convey subtle differences in situation and attitude. They are not defined by a legalistic pedant's obsession with a physical clock. The present progressive is appropriate when what is intended to be conveyed focuses on a process that has or is just about to start but has not yet been completed. If that is not the focus, then another tense is appropriate.

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