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Can i use the word "guys" in virtual learning session? Example: Thank you Guys! Because, this is the first time i am speaking with him and it is dificult to call his name and other person also there. I want to thank both of them. which is correct form?

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  • If there are two of them and you don't know them well, you could just say 'Thank you both.' Apr 28, 2020 at 12:14

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As a Canadian, I would say "thanks guys" or (to be more specific) "thanks guys for attending/participating/taking the time to ..." to a group (of mixed gender) that I knew well or in an informal setting. You could substitute many other phrases there - e.g., "helping me understand", "setting this up", "your work on the project"

For a more formal setting or if you did not know them, I would say "thank you for attending/participating/taking the time to ..." or "thank you all for " or (if 2 people) "thank you both for "

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You can say "Thank you, guys". But there are some issues.

  1. It's casual. Is your learning session a fairly formal affair? If you are a student, you are speaking to a teacher, and it is normal (in your school's culture) to refer to teachers as "Sir", then "Thank you guys" may be too casual.

  2. Some people feel that "guys" can only apply to men and boys. This is less common nowadays, but in the past it would be odd to refer to a woman, or a mixed group of people as "guys".

  3. It might be odd if there are only two people. If there are more people, then thanking each individually might take too long, but with only two, then thank them both by name.

So my preferred solution is "Thank you, John. Thank you, Mary".

If it is normal to refer to the learning group as "guys" (eg they say "Hello guys" when you join or "See you later, guys" when they leave) then "Thank you, guys" is fine. If you generally use names, or "sir" or something else, then use names (or "sir" or something else).

Don't overthink this. People are very very rarely offended when someone says thank you!

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