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Please help in framing sentence using two If condition. I will form sentence using below if conditions.

if zero conditional.

"If I change this data and again someone change this, which data should I consider"

If Second conditional/imagination.

"If suppose I changed this data and again someone changed this, which data should I consider"

If Second conditional/imagination. (2nd version)

"If suppose I changed this data and again someone changes this, which data should I consider"

If Second conditional/imagination. (3nd version)

"If suppose I change this data and again someone changed this data, which data should I consider"

please help me if all my versions are correctly formed as per english grammar rules.

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+25

The problem here is that If suppose ... simply does not make grammatical sense at the start of a sentence, no matter what follows. You want either If or Suppose but not both.

This is grammatically correct: I Suppose if. For example:

I suppose if pigs could fly we would not eat them for breakfast.

As for the rest of your sentence, it's a bit confusing. You probably should have something like:

(if the thing you and the other person changes are the same:)

If I change this and someone changes this too, which data should I consider?

(if the thing you and the other person changes are different:)

If I change this and someone else changes that, which data should I consider?

(using less pronouns is most certainly the clearest option:)

If I change this and someone else changes the data, which data should I consider?

Note in all cases the pronoun use is confusing, in a formal context I'd be explicit about what this refers to.

Also note that both changes and changed work in this context. The difference in tense refers to whether the action happens in the present or past. For a sentence that refers to a hypothetical action, the choice of present or past tense wouldn't make much difference, the speaker can choose either so long as they are consistent.

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Here's a general answer, without categorizing all the conditional statements.

Don't use both "If" and "suppose" in the same statement. Here are two forms, both of which are idiomatic, one using "if", and one using "suppose":

"Suppose I change this data, and someone changes it again. Which data should I consider?"

"If I change this data, and someone changes it again, which data should I consider?"

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  • Thanks for the answer .... But what about imaginary condition – user4084 Apr 30 at 12:30
  • "If I had changed this data and someone had changed it again..." – Jack O'Flaherty Apr 30 at 12:38
  • Ok But why past perfect tense ? Can't we use simple past – user4084 Apr 30 at 16:34
  • "If I changed the data and he changed the same data ..... – user4084 Apr 30 at 16:34
  • Yes, you can say that. – Jack O'Flaherty Apr 30 at 17:04

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