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1) Yet, self-worth should have nothing to do with looks and everything to do with an innate feeling that you really are worth it

2) Yet, self-worth should have nothing to do with looks and everything to do with an innate feeling that you are really worth it

I read a text that used the first sentence but I'm almost sure that the second sentence is correct as well. Am I mistaken?

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Either one can be correct, but it is possible to interpret the two sentences as saying slightly different things. In the first version the word "really" seems to be modifying the word "are", while in the second version the word "really" seems to be modifying the word "worth". To picture the difference in the results, we can construct a dialogue that will bring it out more clearly.

Version 1

Person 1: Am I worth it?
Person 2: Yes, you are worth it.
Person 1: Are you sure? I don't think I really am worth it?
Person 2: Yes, you really are worth it.

Version 2

Person 1: Am I worth it?
Person 2: Yes, you are worth it.
Person 1: But how worth it am I?
Person 2: You are really worth it.

In the first version "really" is being used more like "actually" (e.g. "it really was a joke" means that it actually was a joke and not serious). In the second version it is being used more like "very" (e.g. "he is really good at swordfighting" means that he is very good at swordfighting).

But again, this is more of a subtle difference, and it is certainly possible that both writer and reader would interpret both versions in the same way.

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They are indeed both correct. And they mean very much the same thing, perhaps the exact same thing.

They MAY, however, be read (or may be intended to be read) as having a slight difference in emphasis and therefore a subtle difference in meaning. The first emphasizes very slightly that "you" should believe in yourself. The phrase being given prominence is "you are." The second emphasizes, again very slightly, that "you" should believe that you have something worthy about you. The word being given prominence is "worth."

Personally, if I were trying to convey that distinction, I would do so differently because it is not even clear that the placement of "really" can reliably make such a subtle distinction.

Yet self-worth should have nothing to do with looks and everything to do with your own confidence in your merits

Yet self-worth should have nothing to do with looks and everything to do with your own merits of character and intelligence.

Those two sentences say slightly different things, but do so clearly. Playing around with the placement of "really" may not be interpreted as changing the meaning in any way.

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