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the passage's from Frankenstein play. it's a part of the opening song. What do draft and swine mean? Come gather ye feast on our Empire's riches

New heaven on Earth shall to all ages rise

Those ravenous dogs singing sweet hallelujah

The angels will feed on the draft and the swine.

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    Could you provide more context, e.g. a complete verse of the song? Without this, I'd guess 'draft' = 'draft beer' and 'swine' = 'porc'. – Glorfindel May 4 '20 at 16:33
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    Draft animals are those that pull loads or carry them: horses, oxen, buffalo, donkeys, etc. Swine are pigs. All of these animals can be eaten. – Michael Harvey May 4 '20 at 16:34
  • @Glorfindel I add it! – user103409 May 4 '20 at 16:35
  • @MichaelHarvey Can you explain more about the sentence? – user103409 May 4 '20 at 17:36
  • The angels will eat the cattle and pigs. That's it. – Michael Harvey May 4 '20 at 19:03
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Not knowing anything else about the context, I agree that Michael Harvey's comment is most probable:

Draft animals are those that pull loads or carry them: horses, oxen, buffalo, donkeys, etc. Swine are pigs. All of these animals can be eaten.

This is in opposition to Glorfindel's comment:

I'd guess 'draft' = 'draft beer' and 'swine' = 'porc' [sic].

Note: "porc" should be spelled "pork", in case you are new to English.

There are a couple reasons why draft most likely refers to draft animals here:

  • One does not feed on beer. Beer is a liquid, and liquids cannot be eaten.

  • The addition of swine in a way completes the draft because both (presumably) refer to animals, but pigs do not generally pull or carry loads and are for that reason not considered draft animals. It seems like the intention was to make sure that swine and other non-draft animals are not perceived to be excluded from the terrible fate that awaits horses, oxen, etc.

Also, pork can be synonymous with swine or refer more specifically to pig meat. I suppose either interpretation is acceptable here, as pork signifies the edible parts of swine.

Hope this helps!

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