1

"Sarah and David blamed themselves."

"Sarah and David blamed each other."

Are both these sentences correct? Is there any difference in meaning?

2 Answers 2

1
  • Are both of these sentences correct? Yes, a native speaker might well say them.
  • Is there any difference in meaning? Yes.

Both sentences work. A native speaker might use them. I have certainly heard both. They definitely have different meanings.

Sarah and David blamed themselves could have two slightly different meanings. It might mean Sarah blamed herself and David blamed himself, but neither blamed the other. Or it might mean Sarah blamed both herself and David, and David blamed himself and Sarah. Both are possible understandings. Another very similar meaning would be that Sarah blamed them both as a group, and David blamed them both as a group.

Sara and David blamed each other means Sarah blamed David and David blamed Sarah. I am fairly confident I've never heard this form used where they were thinking of blame in terms of the both of them together.

0

A non native speaker here but since it is too easy, I make an answer.

Are both these sentences correct?

Yes, they are both "grammatically" correct, but they are different in the meaning.

While

Sarah and David blamed themselves

This sentence means they are grieving over their past action,

Sarah and David blamed each other.

This sentence means Sarah is blaming David and David is blaming Sarah, since each other means,

You use each other when you are saying that each member of a group does something to the others

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .