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When you don't have a life goal, you will set a small goal every day, which will distort your effort and waste your time.

I wasn't able to find "distort/distribute your efforts" used by any trustworthy resource, so I thought that it is wrong collocation. What is the right verb instead of distort? I mean distribute your effort over these small goals, which implies making it ineffective.

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Your sentence is grammatically correct, but it isn't idiomatic. I don't know quite what you mean by "distort your effort". If I was reading this in a book, I'd expect an explanation to be forthcoming. Of course, my not-knowing what you mean to say makes it very difficult to advise you what you should say!

I think you're trying to say that accomplishing small, daily goals makes a person feel like they are achieving something, but it amounts to nothing major. If you're really set on a single word to replace "distort" I would suggest "dilute". That makes more sense.

However, it doesn't seem the most idiomatic way to get this point across. I would instead express that as:

When you don't have a life goal, you will set a small goal every day which will give you a false sense of accomplishment and waste your time.

This is a known idiom and would be more recognisable to native English speakers. It also does not assume that the person has limited energies - some people may disagree with your statement that their efforts are diluted. There are loads more ways to express this of course - that's just what feels natural to me.

Also, I know this is beyond the scope of your question, but I would go further with editing this sentence and probably say:

When you don't have a life goal, you are more likely to set yourself small goals each day which can give you a false sense of accomplishment and waste your time.

It just sounds more reasonable to say that someone is likely to do something than say that they definitely will; also that these can give that sense of accomplishment.

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