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I have been noticing in various dictionaries that the phrase 'it's a good thing' is used when something lucky has happened, but can it also mean that whatever 'it' refers to is in a literal sense something that you perceive as just positive (and not involving luck)?

For example: 'I overslept, but it's a good thing as I needed the extra sleep'.

Thanks!

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  • The fact that you overslept on a day when it didn't matter might be regarded as luck! May 9 '20 at 8:02
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    I think the difference between ‘luck’ and ‘something positive’ is less far apart than you’re assuming. May 9 '20 at 8:29
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Consider these two example sentences:

A) I overslept, but it's a good thing as I needed the extra sleep.

B) I bought a spare charging cord for my cell phone, it's a good thing to have around.

Will the charging cord bring you good fortune? Probably not. It's simply a practical thing to own.

In essence, yes. The phrase it's a good thing can refer to an event/situation (e.g. Example A) or to a possession (e.g. Example B).

Hope this helps!

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