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I have encountered "pronounced" a couple of times, but still wondering what it means exactly. I checked these dictionaries for this word: Longman, Cambridge, and Oxford, but in none of them, they touched upon any synonyms such as "noticeable" or "remarkable" except for Cambridge Dictionary, which only mentioned marked.

Nonetheless, many dictionaries define this word with noticeable and other added words, but this intrigues me even more because this demonstrates that these words were in the author's mind when writing the definition of this word, yet they didn't name them as synonymous.

Furthermore, I've searched the internet for them, and there was no answer as well. To summarize, is there any difference between words "pronounced" and "noticeable"? IF so, what are they and their usage in contexts?

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  • You said "I checked all dictionaries ..." Did you check Collins? Here, take a look: pronounced synonyms The first synonym in the list is noticeable.
    – AIQ
    May 9, 2020 at 10:15
  • Did you check Merriam-Webster? Here, take a look: pronounced synonyms It has both noticeable and remarkable.
    – AIQ
    May 9, 2020 at 10:18
  • @AIQ Firstly, thank you for your contribution. Secondly, I must acknowledge that I have not taken a look at them since They don't introduce precise synonyms as Longman, Cambridge, and Oxford do. In other words, they are mostly similar to a thesaurus, suggesting many synonyms without really noting their differences. So, that is the reason. For example, having taken a look at them now, I cannot still figure out their differences However, all of these are my views. Incidentally, I refined my question due to your valuable sentiment.
    – Ali Sirous
    May 9, 2020 at 12:17

1 Answer 1

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They are synonyms and could be interchangeable in many contexts. However, as a native English speaker I have observed that "pronounced" tends to refer to permanent features that are noticeable, for example, "he had a pronounced nose" or "a pronounced accent". "Noticeable" tends to be used for more broader contexts, such as special efforts to be noticeable (eg "a noticeable display) and things that are not necessarily visible (eg "a noticeable smell").

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