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Please take a thorough look at the sentence below:

Low costs of air trips might entice plane manufacturers to commercialize them. In other words, they could take poor standards of maintenance an unimportant matter which endangers people's lives.

this was the main sentence, bow by using fronting I want to turn it into the sentence below:

Low costs of air trips might entice plane manufacturers to commercialize them. In other words, poor standards of maintenance they could take an unimportant matter which endangers people's lives.

In the part which I wrote in bold I tried to use "fronting", yet I am not fully confident whether my usage is grammatically correct with regard to "fronting". If my sentence is incorrect, please rectify it.
Moreover, another problem that I have is that I've read in a limited number of books that fronting is informal, though very implicitly, while it looks extremely complex to me, and I always have wondered whether this grammar is actually formal or not.

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  • Fronting generally involves moving the object or complement of a sentence to the beginning for emphasis. The sentence containing your 'fronting' makes no sense at all. Please edit your question to provide a grammatically correct sentence without fronting, and then repeat the sentence with your impression of how it should be fronted. See this article for brief information about fronting. dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/fronting
    – JavaLatte
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 5:41
  • @JavaLatte thanks for your valuable remark. I've just refined it. However, Cambridge provides a contradictory lesson since in one part it says it is used in spoken language(Sometimes, particularly in speaking, when we want to focus on something important, we bring it to the front of the clause. This is called ‘fronting). in another part does it say in literary or written language(We often find this in written literary or formal contexts.)
    – Ali Sirous
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 5:55
  • Ah, I see the problem with your sentence. take is not ditransitive, so it cannot have both 'poor standards of maintenance' and 'an unimportant matter' as objects. make is ditransitive, so if you replace take with make, it will be grammatically correct. It's still confusing. A better way of saying it would be "They could make maintenance an unimportant matter, which endangers people's lives." it is possible to use fronting with ditransitive words, but you have to be a lot clearer about the meaning before you start.
    – JavaLatte
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 7:28
  • @JavaLatte do you mean "intransitive" by distransitive?
    – Ali Sirous
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 7:36
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    Yes, they are both ditransitive and the meaning is appropriate. Or you could use "take X to be Y".
    – JavaLatte
    Commented May 10, 2020 at 8:04

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