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Is it weird to omit the redundant relative pronoun when using a conjunction to connect multiple adjective sentences? Let me explain what I am asking.

Example 1: who

1(a). He is a hero who men don't like and who women admire.
1(b). He is a hero who men don't like and who women admire. (Redundant relative pronoun omitted)

Example 2: where

2(a). The is a game where I play as a swordsman and where the mission is to kill the dragon.
2(b). The is a game where I play as a swordsman and where the mission is to kill the dragon.

Example 3: when

3(a). Now is the time when we step up or when the government violates our rights.
3(b). Now is the time when we step up or when the government violates our rights.

Example 4: that

4(a). This is a puzzle that I will need to finish by myself or that my brother will come and ruin.
4(b). This is a puzzle that I will need to finish by myself or that my brother will come and ruin.


Another little question: If the sentence is understandable without both relative pronouns, can I omit them?

  1. He is a hero that men don't like and that women look up to.
  2. Today is the day when we will win the game or when our opponents will crush us.
  3. This is the game where I play as a swordsman and where the mission is to slay the dragon.

  • 1
    Hi Vincentlin, I have edited your question to reduce its length and omitted some repeated words that are not necessary. They would be easily understood by the community. If you feel your original version is better, feel free to roll-back my edit. If it is too lengthy, it might be problematic to read it on mobile devices (users may have to scroll back and forth many times to address each of your examples). – AIQ May 13 at 8:24
  • Hi AIQ, thank you. Your revision to my question has made the question more easy to understand. – vincentlin May 13 at 8:28
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+50

I'm also a learner, but here's my take on your question:

If the number of adjective clause is 1, second pronoun is redundant; if the number of adjective clause is 2 or more, second pronoun is not redundant.

Example 1: who

1(a). He is a hero who men don't like and who women admire.

1(b). He is a hero who men don't like and women admire.

IMO, 1(a) and 1(b) are both correct. The different between the two is whether "men don't like" and "women admire" are written as two separate adjective clauses (a) or single adjective clause (b). If you wish to emphasize the difference in attitude towards "he" between "men" and "women", I would suggest going with 1(a), which would make "women admire" as a separate adjective clause and therefore emphasize it.

Example 2: where

2(a). The is a game where I play as a swordsman and where the mission is to kill the dragon.

2(b). The is a game where I play as a swordsman and the mission is to kill the dragon.

Same deal with Example 1 (both correct), with the difference between 2(a) and 2(b) being emphasizing "the mission is to kill the dragon" as much as "I play as a swordsman" (a) or not as much (b) by either making "the mission is to kill the dragon" a separate adjective clause (a) or not (b).

Example 3: when

3(a). Now is the time when we step up or when the government violates our rights.

3(b). Now is the time when we step up or the government violates our rights.

Example 4: that

4(a). This is a puzzle that I will need to finish by myself or that my brother will come and ruin.

4(b). This is a puzzle that I will need to finish by myself or my brother will come and ruin.

*Note: Examples 3&4 are slightly different from Examples 1&2 because it uses or instead of and; if they use and instead of or, the same rule as Examples 1&2 should apply.

If simplified, these example sentences can be read as:

(a). [Subject] is [object] [when/that (1)] or [when/that (2)].

(b). [Subject] is [object] [when/that (1) or (2)].

If (1) & (2) have direct consequential relationship (ei. "we step up" stops "the government violate our rights" from happening), both (a) and (b) can be correct; otherwise, both are incorrect with an exception.

The sentence form (a) can be correct if it has or implies either, as in

[Now] is [either] [the time] [when (we rise)] or [when (we fall)].

[He] is [either] [the man] [that (will save us)] or [that (will doom us)].

Finally, concerning omitting relative pronoun, ef.com instructs as thus:

The relative pronoun can only be omitted when it is the object of the clause. When the relative pronoun is the subject of the clause, it cannot be omitted.

Here's the link for that specific article: https://www.ef.com/wwen/english-resources/english-grammar/defining-relative-clauses/

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  • Thank you for the very detailed explanation on the subject. One little question: Is "Now is either the time when we rise or when we fall" equal to "Now is either the time when we rise or we fall"? Is omitting the second "when" ok here or it is weird to omit it? Finally, I really appreciate your help; the community is strong because there are people like you. – vincentlin May 17 at 6:06
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    Basically the same in that case, so omitting it or not would be more of a style choice imo (although, difference in meaning will result depending on context, similar to how a line could be read seriously or sarcastically depending on context). – Albert May 17 at 8:17
  • Thank you for your answer. I am getting a feel of it. – vincentlin May 19 at 9:22
-1

In Example 1, 'He is a hero who men don't like and who women admire,' the relative pronouns refer to the objects of verbs hence should be 'whom', rather than 'who'.

Omitting both relative pronouns is alright. I think omitting just the 2nd one should be fine too; I am not sure, though, if rules of parallel construction has to be followed here.

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  • Thank you for your help. Would you be more clear? Because I am still a bit confused. How about my other examples? Is it alright to omit relative pronouns in my other examples? And Is it alright to omit just one of the relative pronouns as I do in my examples? – vincentlin May 12 at 3:26

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