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What's the idiomatic way of saying this?

Example:

  • "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it's in 640p."
  • "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it's 640p."
  • "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it's at 640p."

640p refers to the pixel count width wise.

What's the most grammatical, idiomatic way of saying this?

  • I would say, "... makes it look like a 640p one" – Cardinal May 14 at 2:09
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When colour photography first became possible, we would describe a film as being in colour... and old films were in black and white.

I think that the image resolution is a similar property, so one could say in 640 p. You could also simply say that the picture is 640 p.

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Of those sentances the one with "in" looks the most idomatic to me. However.

640p refers to the pixel count width wise.

Umm no.

When talking about video the number before the p or i (BTW p is short for progressive not for pixels) refers to the vertical resolution, not horizontal. 640p is not a common/standard resolution. The normal values are.

  • 240p: half NTSC
  • 480i: NTSC (interlaced)
  • 480p: same as NTSC resoloution but progressive scan, also sometimes known as "VGA".
  • 576i: PAL (interlaced)
  • 576p: PAL resoloution but progressive scan.
  • 720p and 1080i: "HD ready".
  • 1080p: full HD

The corresponding horizontal resolution is less-well defined. Traditionally analog video was not formed of pixels, the video was split into discrete "lines" but the variations within each line were a continuous analog signal.

Digital systems clearly do have pixels but the number varies. On a square-pixel system it will depend on the aspect ratio (4:3 or 16:9) but there are also "Anamorphic widescreen" systems with non-square pixels.

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  • Actually, I wasn't sure it meant that, but I couldn't be bothered, because I just wanted to know what was the idiomatic way of saying it. – remote May 14 at 18:21

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