0

Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell has warned that a full US economic recovery may take until the end of next year

In my opinion, take is a transitive verb. Does "until the end of next year" here act as a noun?

  • You've approved an answer that contains a serious error. See my comment to the poster. – BillJ May 19 at 6:41
  • Thank you BillJ, but what do you mean by "a complement of an intransitive verb"? – wtdark May 20 at 5:48
  • 1
    Adverbials are always optional, but "until the end of the year" is obligatory because its omission would make the sentence ungrammatical. Obligatory items are always complements. Complements are not modifiers, so Jay's answer is wrong on two counts. – BillJ May 20 at 6:29
  • ok, I thought complement is sth after "be verb". – wtdark May 21 at 11:43
  • 1
    No, definitely not!. Those that occur with "be" are predicative (subjective or objective) but complements can occur all over the place. The most obvious complements are those whose omission would render the sentence ungrammatical, like "until the end of next year" in your example. (we clearly can't say *"a full US economic recovery may take". Remember that obligatory items are always complements. – BillJ May 21 at 11:50
1

Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell has warned that a full US economic recovery may take until the end of next year.

No: "take" can be transitive ("take a card"), but in your example it is intransitive.

"Until the end of the year" is a preposition phrase functioning as complement of "take". It has a temporal meaning.

We know it's a complement because it's obligatory; its omission would render the sentence ungrammatical.

| improve this answer | |
  • If, instead of "until the end of the year", it said "will take time", would you consider that transitive? – Jack O'Flaherty May 18 at 17:17
-1

"Until the end of next year" is acting as an adverb. It modifies the verb.

The original sentence is odd wording. I think most English speakers would have said "will LAST until ..." or "will CONTINUE until ..."

Yes, "take" is, or can be, a transitive verb. But just because a verb is transitive doesn't mean that the words that follow it must be the object of the verb. If I said, "Bob will take a cookie", then yes, a cookie is the thing Bob is taking. But if I said, "Bob will take selfishly", "selfishly" is not the thing he is taking. It is an adverb describing how he takes.

| improve this answer | |
  • Sorry, the first part of your answer contains an error. "Until the end of next year" is syntactically obligatory and hence can only be a complement. It does not modify the verb. Adjuncts (adverbials) are always optional elements. – BillJ May 19 at 6:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.