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  1. I have a friend whom I met last year, started a new business, was not interested in it.

  2. I have a friend who I met last year, started a new business, was not interested in it.

My grammar book is saying sentence2 is correct as “who” becomes subject of started a business, was not interested in it.

But I feel that sentence1 is correct, as whom becomes object of I met last year.

Which is correct?

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    The sentence is very unclear to me (which person started the business, and which wasn't interested?) I have a friend whom I met last year, who started a new business but wasn't interested in it would make more sense. – Kate Bunting May 19 at 8:39
  • The main part of the sentence is ungrammatical (as well as ambiguous), regardless of the use of use of who or whom. So, neither of the two examples sentences are correct as they stand. If they come from a grammar book, it's not a very good grammar book, and I wouldn't rely on it. – Jason Bassford May 20 at 4:27
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Your sentence contains the following clauses :

Main clause : I have a friend.

Subordinate clause (1) : who/whom I met

Subordinate clause (2) : who started a new business

Subordinate clause (3) : who was not interested in it.

The relative pronoun who is common in these subordinate clauses. So, if you introduce the 1st subordinate clause with who, you can omit it in other two clauses :

I have a friend who I met last year, (who) started a new business, and (who) was not interested in it.

[The objective form of "who" is whom or who].

If you introduce the first subordinate clause with 'whom', you have to introduce the other clauses with 'who'.

I have a friend whom I met last year, who started a new business and who was not interested in it.

You can omit the 2nd who in this sentence.

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