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For example- Maybe she won't come to our party.

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  • Remove "maybe" and the example now reads "She won't come to our party" nothing hesitant or uncertain in that statement. Quite the opposite in fact! The person either stoutly refuses to attend to the party or the speaker is making a (pessimistic?) prediction. – Mari-Lou A May 19 '20 at 9:03
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Remove the "maybe" and the example now reads

"She won't come to our party"

There is nothing hesitant or uncertain in that statement. Quite the opposite in fact, "she" either stoutly refuses to attend the party or the speaker is making a (pessimistic?) prediction.

  1. I won't do it!

(I refuse to do it)

  1. Maybe I won't do it

(I might not do it)

To express uncertainty in the future, you can use the modal verb might

She might come to our party

Like wouldn't for past situations, won't can be used to talk about refusal when it relates to present situations:

  • I can't get these pictures to download. I keep clicking on this icon, but they won't download.

  • It's no good trying to persuade him. He won't go and that's that.

Source: BBC Learning English
Wouldn't/would & won't/will for refusals and insistence

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  • would you please explain this to me?1.I will go to the park tomorrow.2.I will definitely go to the park tomorrow.Does the two sentences shows different level of certainty? – user11634197 May 21 '20 at 1:50
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    "Definitely" is used for emphasis, it leaves out any lingering hesitancy or doubt. – Mari-Lou A May 21 '20 at 1:59
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We often use will in predictions of future events :

e.g., Tomorrow will be warm, with some cloud in the afternoon.

Moreover, the adverb Maybe (=perhaps) has been used in your example to show the possibility :

Maybe she won't come to our party.

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