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What is the point in/of doing it?

Which preposition is correct?

I have always been using "in" buf yesterday my Australian friend said "point in". Are they both correct? Is there any difference in meaning?

(I apologize if there is already the same question but i did not find it)

Thanks in advance.

  • This is an interesting question. To me (native US speaker), both "What's the point in going to the store?" and "What's the point of going to the store?" sound fine. But "There's no point of going to the store." sounds odd, while "There's no point in going to the store." sounds fine. "What was her point in going to the store?" sound fine, but "What was her point of going to the store?" sound ungrammatical (ie not just odd, but wrong). – weissj May 19 at 21:12
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    On the other hand, "She made a point of going to the store" and "She made a point in going to the store" both work but mean different things to me. In the first, she emphasized the fact that she was going to the store. In the 2nd, she emphasized something else by going to the store. What that something else was isn't stated. Confusing, I know. Hopefully, someone else can make sense of it. – weissj May 19 at 21:14
  • To further confuse, you could say she made a point by going to the store. – Jack O'Flaherty May 19 at 23:22
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If you are only asking about the specific question "What is the point doing something", either is fine and there is no difference in meaning.

If you're interested in the phrase "the point ..." in general, the situation is more complicated, and I don't have an answer. (See my comments on the question.)

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