2

I have decided not to go back to (in?into?) Tax.

Meaning:

I had worked in the Tax department before,but have decided not to do the Tax work anymore.

Is the last sentence grammatically correct?

  • Which sentence are you asking for feedback on? The first (shorter) one, or the last (longer) one? – jimsug Jun 4 '14 at 14:38
  • Into. You can refer to your field of your profession that way. I don't want to get back into software anymore. it's understood that way we say : I'm into software though into means interested, it's common to say you are into for the field you are working in. – Maulik V Jun 4 '14 at 14:43
  • 'to' might also be appropriate if you wanted to refer to that specific department, rather than tax work generally. You go 'to' a location, 'into' a field. – MrTheWalrus Jun 4 '14 at 14:47
  • the first sentence – Sam Jun 4 '14 at 15:10
  • Got it! In this contest "into"would be more appropriate since the meaning is to change the field in the profession. – Sam Jun 4 '14 at 15:13
1

If you mean any tax related occupation, you could say:

I have decided not to go back into the tax business.

tax business refers to that occupation in general.

If you mean just that department, you could say:

I have decided not to go back to the tax department.

And tax is lower case unless its part of a proper name.

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