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Now reading this article, I encountered a verb(probably slang) I quite don't understand.

Gary Payton, the former NBA player says,

“Oh you know I was hot! I was thinking about calling him at the time!” admitted Payton. “But you know what, that’s what I expect out of Mike, because I would have said the same thing. I’m not going to admit to nothing, I’m not going to admit to someone that D’d me up.. I will always tell you at any time in my career, nobody gave me problems but one person and that’s John Stockton to me.

According to the info provided @EddieKal, D-up means,

An abbreviated term for playing defense. The term is usually yelled by teammates after an opposing player has scored 20 points at your expense.

Gary Payton says Michael Jordan was not the hardest guy to defend, but it was John Stockton who gave him the trouble. Then shouldn't have he said "I "only can" admit to someone that D'd me up, because it was John Stockton that gave him a trouble?


Updated

Later the verb appears again. There is a line,

“I’m not mad at Mike, because Mike didn’t have too many games that somebody D’d him up

By here he is saying only he, Gary Payton could defend Micheal enough.

So back to the above sentence, by Payton sayins as

I’m not going to admit to someone that D’d me up..

Doesn't his saying sound strange because Jordan was not the hardest guy to him?

I don't understand the logic of Payton here. Sorry.

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  • I've never heard of it. If it's a way of avoiding an obscene word, it's odd that it is capitalized. – Jack O'Flaherty May 20 '20 at 19:11
  • @JackO'Flaherty Is it? But it came from the "official" interview from Gary Payton on air...but thank you. – user17814 May 20 '20 at 19:13
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    Appears to be basketball jargon. "D-Up: An abbreviated term for playing defense. The term is usually yelled by teammates after an opposing player has scored 20 points at your expense." (source: CBS) – Eddie Kal May 20 '20 at 19:18
  • @EddieKal Thank you for the info. Now the problem is, it would be so probably, but then if the definition would be so, the line that continues after the verb then would not make sense. Payton says after the verb, "I will always tell you at any time in my career, nobody gave me problems but one person and that’s John Stockton to me." So he sure admits John Stockton was the hardest guy to him on defense, not Jordan. Then the sentence should be "I "only" admit to someone that D'd me up". But thank you. – user17814 May 20 '20 at 19:25
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    I agree that even with knowledge of that basketball slang it is not easy to decipher what Payton is talking about here. I think Payton's interview response is somewhat garbled, but that is common in sports interviews. Let's wait and see if someone familiar with the NBA can explain it better. Btw +1 for the details. – Eddie Kal May 20 '20 at 19:38
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"D-Up" is a basketball term; it's not a slang; it's the moment when the real test begins; when you make things personal and take someone on one-on-one. It means to increase the level and intensity of your defense because the other team is on a roll. "D him up" or "D-up on him" is used when one player is just destroying your team or quickly getting hot. It means to up your defense on someone.

The logic here is that you never admit to your rival that they are good at their job, and that they may have affected you in someway.

It is something like "show no weakness; show no fear". When your rival defends you all game along with all they have got, the last thing you do is admit to them that their defense worked (by that I mean you never do that). You want to downplay the struggle you had from their defense. You don't want to give them that satisfaction.

This is MJ being classic MJ.


Payton, nicknamed The Glove, was the reigning Defensive Player of the Year when the Seattle Supersonics took on the Bulls in the 1996 NBA Finals, ...

Think of it this way:

Payton (to reporter): If I had D'd up on Mike, we would have won.

Reporter to MJ: Payton said he could have fully stopped your offense if he was allowed to.

MJ (to reporter): LOL!!! I had "no problem with The Glove"

MJ wants to say that even if Payton brought his best defense that series, it wouldn't be enough to stop him. MJ is saying that Payton's defense was insignificant. After all, MJ is the greatest of all times.

It is quite common among superior NBA athletes to not show that they are bothered or intimidated by other elite players. MJ is doing just that. He is essentially saying Payton couldn't have stopped him even if Payton really up-ed the defense on him. In MJ's case, it is true; MJ isn't faking it.

But Payton is saying that MJ is faking it. Payton says that if he were MJ, he too would say the same thing (i.e., Payton wouldn't admit to the person who defended him that their defense was great).

‘But you know what, that’s what I expect out of Mike, because I would have said the same thing (i.e., say my defender was no problem). I’m not going to admit to nothing, I’m not going to admit to someone that D'd me up (i.e., I am not going to admit to the person who guarded me all game long that he had an effect on my offense).

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