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I got stuck by the following sentence, which can be found here:

If we generate the column proportions, we can see that a higher fraction of plain text emails are spam(209/1195 = 17.5%) than compared to HTML emails (158/2726 = 5.8%).

I wonder if the complete sentence should be this:

If we generate the column proportions, we can see that text emails contain a higher fraction of spam(209/1195 = 17.5%) when (they are) compared to HTML emails (158/2726 = 5.8%)

The structure is obvious and the grammar is simple.

I don't understand why it should be expressed as "than compared to" since I thought this sentence would be correct and more comprehensible:

If we generate the column proportions, we can see that a higher fraction of plain text emails are spam(209/1195 = 17.5%) than that of HTML emails (158/2726 = 5.8%)

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"Than compared to" is an error. When drawing comparisons you would normally use either "than" or "compared to", and they are not necessarily interchangable.

For example:

  • America has a larger population than Great Britain.
  • America has a large population compared to Great Britain.

Use "than" when you are using a comparitive adjective like larger or a determiner such as more, less or fewer.

Use "compared to" when you are using a regular adjective like large and are just citing a second example for comparison.

Your example is a grammatical error. Clearly a comparison study has been made between the two kinds of email, but when presenting factual results (especially with specific numbers) you can plainly state that one number is greater than, or more than the other. That they are being compared goes without saying.

Note that in British English, we prefer "compared with", however the American "compared to" is commonly heard too.

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