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I am writing an article. I want to select a suitable sentence for the part of my article. Assume that there are N tasks, T1 through TN, located on a processor. Every task Ti has an attribute--let me call it ki.

Now, after my introduction of a formula such as X = ki + Y, I want to immediately write about ki after the formula. Which of the following sentences is more appropriate?

X = ki + Y; where ki is an attribute for the tasks located in order i on the processor.
X = ki + Y; where ki is an attribute for the tasks located in sequence i on the processor.
[...]

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    Where ki is an attribute for the tasks in the sequence of i elements
    – Scarl
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:00
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    I think saying "ki is an attribute of task Ti" is possible, but it is better to say what the attribute is explicitly. For example, if k is an expected execution time, you can write, "where ki is the expected execution time of task Ti". Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 22:37
  • @ Damkerng T. Thank you for editing my question. Specially the part " Assume that there are N tasks, T1 through TN". I have changed this part in my article.
    – Finder
    Commented Jun 5, 2014 at 9:06

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The subscript i is neither an order nor a sequence; it is an index into an order or a sequence. Therefore referring to "order i" or "sequence i" is incorrect.

Something like

Where ki is an attribute of the task Ti on the processor

or

where ki is an attribute of the task at position i

would be much better.

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  • Thank for your answer. I think your first sequence and also Damkerng's sequence are OK but they cannot be appropriate for my article because of some details that I do not mention them in my question. But I accept your second sentence
    – Finder
    Commented Jun 5, 2014 at 8:13

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