0

School of foundation studies dean, Dr.Wise said.....

School of foundation studies dean Dr.Wise said.....

Which sentence with comma is correct and why?

3
  • 2
    Yes, a comma makes sense. It can be like: a) Dr. Wise, School of Foundation Studies, said.... or b) (The) School of Foundation Studies, Dr. Wise said....
    – Ram Pillai
    May 22 '20 at 5:02
  • 1
    @RamPillai this error is very common, but it is an error nonetheless.
    – phoog
    May 22 '20 at 6:42
  • @Ram Pillai But the newspaper that I read sometimes they don't put comma. For example, from the link given below 'Senior Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob'. There is no comma in between. thestar.com.my/news/nation/2020/05/21/… May 22 '20 at 9:13
1

Titles should not be separated from their bearers' names with commas except when the name or the title is used parenthetically. In that case, the parenthetical phrase must be set off with two commas, and the title will normally have the definite article (or perhaps another determiner).

School of Foundation Studies dean Dr. Wise said...

The School of Foundation Studies dean, Dr. Wise, said...

Dr. Wise, the School of Foundation Studies dean, said...

Now Dr. Wise's actual title is probably just Dean, so it is probably better to use the phrase Dean of the School of Foundation Studies. I also read once, in the New York Times style guide if I recall correctly, that someone's occupation should only precede the name if it is a formal title, and this advice strikes me as eminently sensible. You would also normally do this only on first mention, when you would also mention the person's full name. Therefore:

Dr. Verity Wise, Dean of the School of Foundation Studies, said...

Dean Verity Wise of the School of Foundation Studies said...

The Dean of the School of Foundation Studies, Dr. Verity Wise, said...

0

As written, the sentence needs commas - before and after "Dr Wise".

As this style guide explains, if someone is both a Doctor and a Dean, you would not address them using both titles, just the one for the capacity in which you were reffering to them. For example, if you were writing to him in his capacity as Dean, you would write "Dear Dean Wise", but socially you might call him "Dr Wise".

Your example is not an address. It states the position of "school of foundation studies dean", and it seems the intention is to then show parenthetically that the role belongs to "Dr Wise". As a parenthetical statement, it requires commas to open and close it:

School of foundation studies dean, Dr.Wise, said.....

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.