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The dictator has fled the country, or rather you can say we have scared him away.

           And

The dictator has fled the country, or in fact you can say we have scared him away.

Are they both valid?

Can I use or rather and in fact here to make a little correction of what I previously said?

How would a native speaker say this?

Thanks in advance.

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Both are valid expressions. In my opinion or rather (expressing the same thing in a different way) fits better here. In fact would be used when restating something in a more explicit way.

The dictator has resigned: in fact, he has fled the country.

  • Isn't it a semi-colon that should come after the word 'resigned'? Just a doubt @Kate Bunting. Also can't we consider, "The dictator resigned; in fact, he fled the country", too? – Ram Pillai May 23 '20 at 13:27

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