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"Mc" in "McDonald" or other words starting with "Mc" means "son of". For example, "McDonald" is equal to "Donaldson" or "son of Donald".

1-Now how will "McDonald" change if we want to say "daughter of Donald" or "Donalddaughter"?
2-Is it insulting to call a person in this way? I mean if the father's name of a person is "X", we could say McX

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    Although Mc, Mac, M' etc, are Scots and Irish Gaelic family-name prefixes meaning 'son of', the family names thus formed are used equally by men and women. Scotland is not Iceland. – Michael Harvey May 23 at 12:45
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    If your enquiry is about the Scots or Gaelic languages, it is off-topic here. – Michael Harvey May 23 at 12:47
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    Feminine of 'Mac' would be Inghean. – Decapitated Soul May 23 at 12:48
  • @DecapitatedSoul you mean we can say IngheanDonald? Another question is: Is it insulting to call a person in this way? I mean if the father's name of a person is "X", we could say McX. – lee May 23 at 12:54
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    @lee v- those Mac & Mc name forms originated centuries ago; they are just normal family names in modern times. A woman can be called McSomething. – Michael Harvey May 23 at 13:50
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The feminine of 'Mac/ Mc' is 'Ni' or 'nighean'.

NI

(also nee and nighean or inghean or even inghean uí) In the Irish patronymic naming system, indicates that the individual is the daughter of the man whose surname follows.

The form is:

inghean uí ,

which means: daughter of a male descendant of .

For example: Dearbhorgaill inghean uí Conchobhair' which means: Dearbhorgaill daughter of a male descendant of Conchobhar (or, fully Anglicized, Dervorgilla daughter of a male descendant of Connor). Later the word inghean was corrupted to nighean, which was further shortened to ni. - Rootsweb


Ní: A prefix used with a woman's maiden surname.

Example: Deirdre Ní Cheallaigh – literally "Deirdre, daughter of a descendant of Ceallach" (anglicized form Deirdre Kelly) - Wikitionary

Also see Wikipedia article about Irish names

EDIT:

I think it is important to say that many - probably most - women with Mac in their family name do not change it to Ni in an English-speaking context. Some do, however. — Colin Fine

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    I think it is important to say that many - probably most - women with Mac in their family name do not change it to Ni in an English-speaking context. Some do, however. – Colin Fine May 23 at 22:29
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You have misunderstood how "Mac" works in English. It is part of a person's name, and has nothing to do with their gender, or the name of their father.

Names come from many different sources, but there is no longer any meaning in any of them. *Henry Longfellow" might have been a short man; Andrew York wasn't from York; Miranda Richardson is a woman and the daughter of William.

You don't use "Mac" to mean "son of" in English. If you know that Jack Smith is the son of Thomas Smith, you would never say "Jack MacThomas Smith".

So Linda MacDonald is not changed to anything else. Her name is MacDonald.

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