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A: How's it going with you and Toby?

B: Great. Actually, he's just moved in with me.

Can I say "Actually, he's just..." or should it just be "he"?

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  • The word actually AND the contraction he's are both irrelevant to the syntactic issue here, which is simply that Simple Past He moved in and Present Perfect He has moved in are often equivalent and interchangeable. Commented May 25, 2020 at 12:30
  • Does this answer your question? He {went / has gone / had gone} out 5 minutes ago Commented May 25, 2020 at 12:32
  • I wonder if you know what he's means.
    – Lambie
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

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You can use either he's or he just depending on the time period of the person who has moved in, but you can't use both he's and just.

He's moved in...

This will mean that he has moved in for few weeks or months, whereas,

He just moved in...

This will mean that he has moved in few days ago which is why you use just.

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    Not sure where you got that idea. "Have just done something" is perfectly valid syntax. Commented May 25, 2020 at 11:26
  • 1
    "He has" = present perfect = Started in the past, continuing in the present. "Just" = happened recently. There's no clash conflict these two. Commented May 25, 2020 at 13:01
  • Oh okay, thanks for clarifying.
    – Spectra
    Commented May 25, 2020 at 16:52
  • As a native speaker, I hear people say things like "he's just..." all the time. It doesn't sound the least bit wrong to my ear. I would like to point out that in your final paragraph, you actually use the perfect to describe exactly the same situation, so it's not semantically wrong, either.
    – Kevin
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 20:37

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