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As it turns out your assuptions were true, as has been evidenced by her conviction for murder last week.

Here using has been is wrong and we should be using was, right? Since when we mention a time in the past, we go for the simple past and not the present perfect.

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    You are simply mistaken. Using has been in the cited context is perfectly okay (as is was). Anyone who tries to tell you otherwise isn't a native speaker of English. Note that in the exact cited context, most native speakers probably wouldn't include any auxiliary verbs at all. And they'd probably go for a more common main verb: ...as shown / demonstrated by her conviction last week. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica May 25 at 16:32
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The sentence:

  1. As it turns out your assuptions were true, as has been evidenced by her conviction for murder last week.

is correct. Alternatively, "was" can also be used:

  1. As it turns out your assuptions were true, as was evidenced by her conviction for murder last week.

Or, still better, we could use a reduced participial clause:

  1. As it turns out your assuptions were true, as evidenced by her conviction for murder last week.

The reason why the present perfect is possible despite the presence of the adverbial "last week" is that this adverbial may be considered as modifying "her conviction for murder":

  1. As it turns out your assuptions were true, as has been evidenced by the fact that she was convicted for murder last week.

What happened last week was that she was convicted for murder. The realization or the recognition that the interlocutor's assumptions were true is not time-dependent and may be more recent, and this renders the present perfect perfectly possible.

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