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In Does "make 3 predictions" sound natural? I make up a sentence

I'd like to make 3 predictions about the future of New York City, which are about population, housing prices and crime rate. First of all, the population of New York will increase ...

Should I use "the" there?

I'd like to make 3 predictions about the future of New York City, which are about the population, the housing prices and the crime rate. First of all, the population of New York will increase ...

Those features are specific to New York City and a tutorial says

Don’t use "the" with names of streets or other city features

However, when talking about the population of a specific place, people usually use "the"

the population of New York

the population of China

Which rule should I apply?

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  • 1
    As you say, we refer to the population of New York, so your second example is certainly correct (or you could say its population etc.) I think the first version could be acceptable too (population meaning the topic of population in general). May 26 '20 at 8:24
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    They're both right
    – codi6
    Jul 10 '20 at 21:48
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This:

I'd like to make 3 predictions about the future of New York City, which are about population, housing prices and crime rate. First of all, the population

would be better said as,

I'd like to make 3 predictions about the future of New York City: it's population, housing prices and crime rate. First of all, the population

This statement:

Don’t use "the" with names of streets or other city features

Is about something else. It is about the names of features, and it is only general. So if the name of the street is 'Broadway', you don't say, "I'm going down to the Broadway street." There are exceptions: certain names include 'the' in them; thus 'the Empire State Building'. 'The Globe Theater' etc.

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  • Thank you. Would you please explain a bit about "other city features"?
    – PutBere
    Jul 15 '20 at 7:10
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I think that advice is about when to use articles with named city features. For instance:

  • I am going to the park. (not named)
  • I am going to Central Park. (named)

City features seem to be an exception to a larger rule that when the name of something references what that thing is, you use an article:

  • I am going to the Empire State Building. (a building)
  • I am going to the Bronx Zoo. (a zoo)
  • I am going to Madison Square Garden. (not a garden)

But this is highly localized and has many other unpredictable exceptions:

  • I am going to Penn Station. (a station)

There is no real consistency in the exceptions either:

  • I am going to Rockefeller Center.
  • I am going to the Kennedy Center.

In the end, you just have to listen to how the locals use names and mimic them.

Thankfully, you will still be understood if you get any of the exceptions wrong; it will just mark you as a non-local.

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