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In the sentence: "Rough and ready does not refer to time, but means of low or poor quality."

Is 'means of' a prepositional verb?

I searched for it in the internet but I didn't find a full reference for prepositional verbs and also 'mean of' wasn't in the available lists.

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    "Rough and ready does not refer to time, but means of low or poor quality." - You split the sentence at the wrong place. May 27 '20 at 17:40
  • This is a good place to use a definite article: the means of. That would mark means as a noun and not a verb, which is a good start. May 27 '20 at 18:04
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    Rough and ready has a different shade of meaning to "poor quality". It means something made from whatever is to hand, without implying that it is necessarily a poor solution – it may well be a very good solution under the circumstances it was made. May 27 '20 at 18:07
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    I think "means" is a verb. I would recast the sentence as "Rough and ready does not refer to time; rather it means (of) low or poor quality".
    – BillJ
    May 27 '20 at 18:07
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    The verbal meaning can be brought out in "rough and ready does not refer to time -- rough and ready means (of) low or poor quality."
    – BillJ
    May 27 '20 at 18:17

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