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"What are you doing here (in a bar)? Is something wrong?"

"No. No, I’m just having a drink."

"You’ve had at least five since I got here. It looks pretty serious. And actually I saw you here last week too. So are you sure something's not wrong?"

Question: Is the sentence in bold natural? Or would any of the sentences below be better to use?

And actually I also saw you here last week.

And actually I saw you here last week also.

Plus I saw you here last week too.

2 Answers 2

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And actually I saw you here last week too.

Yes: that's natural. Or we might say as well instead of too.

And actually I also saw you here last week.

Not bad, but the first four words all start with vowels, which is a bit tiresome.

And actually I saw you here last week also. - No. We don't normally end sentences with 'also'.

Plus I saw you here last week too. - Yes, it's natural. 'Plus' used to be frowned on as a conjunction. Nowadays it isn't even deemed 'informal'.

[I speak BrE. Speakers of AmE may disagree with some of this answer.]

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We can use-

'And actually I saw you here last week too.'

'And actually I also saw you here last week.'

'And actually I saw you here last week also.'

'And actually I saw you here last week as well.'

Too, also and as well are adverbs having the same meaning. They mean 'in addition'.

Too is common in informal situations. We usually put it in end position.

Also is common in writing. We usually use it in mid position (between the subject and main verb), or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after 'be' as a main verb. We can use 'also' in end position. 'Also' can be used at the beginning of a sentence.

As well is commonly used in conversation. It usually comes at the end of a clause.

We do not usually use too, also, and as well in negative sentences.

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