1

Am I right both sentences are correct and usable?

Andy’s car has the same colour as Laura’s car.

Andy’s car is the same colour as Laura’s car.

TIA

2

[1] Andy’s car has the same colour as Laura’s car.

[2] Andy’s car is the same colour as Laura’s car.

[1] is not at all natural. We don't normally use the verb "have" to describe the colour of a car.

[2] is fine, though you can drop "car" from the comparative clause. Note that comparative clauses are normally obligatorily reduced in some way relative to the structure of main clauses.

We understand: Andy's car is x colour; Laura's car is y colour; x=y

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  • So, the best choise is "Andy’s car is the same colour as Laura’s.", isn't it? – Sergey Jun 4 at 11:17
  • @Sergey Yes, you are right. "Car" can be omitted". – BillJ Jun 4 at 11:25
0

Your first sentence is correct & formal. But your second sentence is absolutely ok.

In your second sentence, you could also use a PP, 'of the same colour' instead of 'the same colour' :

"Andy’s car is of the same colour as Laura’s car."

You could omit the noun 'car' after 'Laura's' :

"Andy’s car is of the same colour as Laura’s."

(Laura's = Laura's car).

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  • 1
    My examples are from very famous book and there is mistake existence is about some minimum. Are you sure about your correction? – Sergey Jun 4 at 9:48
  • Both "Andy’s car is of the same colour as Laura’s" and ""Andy’s car is the same colour as Laura’s" are correct. – Sandip Kumar Mandal Jun 4 at 12:53

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