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I know "viewpoint(the point of view = perspective):"World Stories are tales told from a local point of view." (a point of view = a perspective).

But, what difference is there between saying "view" and "viewpoint" as in: "Any of the views expressed by the speakers do not necessarily represent the views of the Merciful Servant or any other projects it may have or intend to do."

What about if "views" was replaced with "viewpoints": "Any of the viewpoints expressed by the speakers do not necessarily represent the viewpoints of the Merciful Servant or any other projects it may have or intend to do."

Is really using "view"instead of "viewpoint" just slightly more formal?

I was told: "In my "point of view,” using "viewpoint" in this way gives you a chance to use it slightly more formally. Also you can use view in the following sense. "As Donald looked down across the verdant valley. He realised his viewpoint was far superior to his rivals." His view of the road was completely free from obstructions."

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  • Idiomatically, your view normally means what you think, whereas your viewpoint refers to the perspective from which you make observations. And often, what you think is to at least some extent determined by how (and/or from where) you see things. Jun 6 '20 at 13:20
  • As with scenery, a view is what you see, and a viewpoint is where you see it from. "My view on gas safety is that you should not have any naked flames. My viewpoint is that of a gas fitter." Jun 6 '20 at 13:20
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"Any of the views expressed" means "Any of the opinions expressed". If I say "My viewpoint is that of a contributor to Stack Exchange" I am saying that I consider issues using knowledge and opinions I have learned on this site.

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