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I wanted to say that chocolate which I did not like to eat earlier when I was 5 year old I like to eat it now? Then is it correct to say

"I did not like this chocolate earlier but now I like it very much" Or "I was not liking this chocolate earlier but now I like it very much"

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I did not like this chocolate when I was young, but now I like it very much.

You can use when I was young to specify those things that change when you grow up. Of course if you want to be age specific, you could say when I was five (years old).

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You'd better use the past habit. The past habit is something you were doing it and you give up doing it. The action of doing something changes through time.


Rule: Affirmative: Used to + Base verb (infinitive).
Negative: Didn't use to + inf.
Question: Did you use to + inf.
You said, "I didn't like this chocolate, but now you did."

It would be better to use the rule, as follows:

I didn't use to eat this chocolate, but now I like it very much.

Or,

I didn't use to eat this chocolate, but now I do.

I hope this helps!

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